Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘surrender’

Surrender

Surrender is when people stop fighting . In war, a white flag is a common symbol of surrender, as is the gesture of raising one’s hands empty and open above one’s head.

I was listening to a video clip by Rob Bell the other day (and no I’m not a universalist – I just like his style) and he talked about how most of us walk around with white knuckles, desperately holding onto to things and people.  He advocates that we should walk around with open hands, because only in an open hand can we release things and have things placed.  Perhaps this is what happens when and after we surrender.

Surrendering is not merely a once-and-for-all experience. It is continuous, day by day. When our soul struggles to live and preserve itself, that is a call to a deeper relationship with God.  It means more opening to Him with hearts, hands and arms wide open. Surrendering is not just the act of denying the self. It is an interruption of the motions of the life to connect with God.

Don’t seek God in temples. He is close to you. He is within you. Only you should surrender to Him and you will rise above happiness and unhappiness. ~ Leo Tolstoy

By surrender we find rest in our souls (Matt. 11:28-30). Our soul  exists for God – He put it there – to contain Him, to be filled with Him, and to express Him. His resurrection life and power  passes through every battle that we may experience.  We have access to this divine power in surrender and letting go.

I have a lot to learn here.  I’m still walking around white knuckled.  I need to open up and trust God more.  It’s not easy – but I know it’s important.  One day I’ll get there.

So what about you?  What does surrender mean to you, and what do you need to hold less tightly and open your hands to?  Here or somewhere this week will you share your thoughts?  You may just help someone let go and receive something.

Surrender

In these timber trenches
In darkness, I dig in
God protect me in these killing fields
And save my soul, from sin

In this war I am blind
And deaf from friendly fire
Protect my heart with Your shield
Be my Jehovah Jireh

These trenches are my prison
The enemy marches near
God, my rock of ages past
Break me out of here

So I wave my flag of dirty white
At Your feet, I fall
To my Jesus and my King
I surrender all

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Frances Ridley Havergal (1836 – 1879) was a Christian writer, poet, hymn writer and musician.  She was brought up in a Christian family in Worcestershire, England.  At the age of 3  Havergal could read.  At the age of 4, she began reading and memorizing the Bible, and at age 7 she began writing poetry.

Havergal was a devoted Bible student, memorizing the New Testament as well as the Psalms, Isaiah, and the Minor Prophets. Although highly cultured and educated she maintained a simple faith and confidence in her Lord. She lived a disciplined prayer life and it is said that she never wrote a line without first praying over it.

Havergal’s most famous hymn Take my Life and Let it Be is an extraordinary poem and is a great example of rhyming couplets

Take my life, and let it be consecrated, Lord, to Thee.
Take my moments and my days; let them flow in ceaseless praise.
Take my hands, and let them move at the impulse of Thy love.
Take my feet, and let them be swift and beautiful for Thee.

Havergal had this to say about writing:

Writing is praying with me. You know a child would look up at every sentence and say, ‘And what shall I say next?’ That is just what I do; I ask Him that at every line He would give me not merely thoughts and power, but also every word, even the very rhymes.

If you’re a writer what does this say to you?  Will you do anything different?   Here’s my relection, I’m working on moving the words from my head to my heart, and from understanding to belief.


Ever, Only, All for Thee

More of you and less of me.
This is how my world should be.

Less of me and more of you,
Shift my world and change my view.

Use my talents and my skill,
Mould me to your perfect will.

Transform my mind, renew my soul
Fill me up and make me whole.

Take my worry and my fear,
Hold me close when night draws near.

Cast my shadows into the night,
Turn me toward your brilliant light.

Cover me with your peace today,
This to you my Lord I pray.

Take my life and let it be,
Ever, only, all for thee.

Read Full Post »

I think I may have mentioned before that I am a huge fan of Amy Grant.  I know that Christian music has moved on, but I have always liked Amy’s music.  I spoke at a leadership event last week and I did a quick poll of who was a fan of Amy Grant.  Out of the 100+ people there, there were a grand total of  two fans, me and one other bloke.  We had a great conversation afterwards about our favourite songs, and whether Amy has lost too much weight and needs to eat some more cake.

Anyway, one of Amy’s songs, El Shaddai has always struck a chord we me (pun intended).  I learnt the chords and all the words and can still play it on my guitar.  It’s a fairly tricky song to play but great to perform to an audience. 

Hearing this song was the first time I realised there are a whole lot of different names for God in the Hebrew language. Each name describes a different characteristic of God. El Shaddai is conventionally translated as God Almighty.

Wikipedia had this to say about the origin and meaning of El Shaddai:

The term may mean “God of the mountains,” referring to the Mesopotamian divine mountain. The term was one of the patriarchal names for the tribal god of the Mesopotamians. In Exodus 6:3, El Shaddai is identified explicitly with the God of Abraham and with YHWH (Yahweh).

I was reflecting on the different names of God, and how I use the word ‘God’ far too generically.  I think I might try a different approach and think about the character of God I need to focus on when I pray and worship.  What about you? Do you think the term ‘God’ is far too overused?  Let me really stick my neck out on the line.  Do you think the word ‘God’ has become a cliché?

Here’s my thoughts on the names of God wrapped up in a poem about surrender:

At Your Feet

At Your feet we fall
El Elyona, Lord of all
Restore us, by Your love
As we look to Your light above
          Forgive us Lord
          As at Your feet we fall

On Calvary’s hill
El Shaddai, we exalt You still
Guide us, with Your hand
Help us seek then understand
         Forgive us Lord
         As at Your feet we fall

On Your cross of strife
We surrender our broken lives
Convict us, of our doubt
Turn out faith inside out
         Forgive us Lord
         As at Your feet we fall.

We give our all to You
Lord, mould our hearts anew
Align us, to Your will
May we learn to seek You still
        Forgive us Lord
        As at Your feet we fall

If you’re interested in finding out more about some different names of God, this YouTube clip is a really great reflective introduction

Read Full Post »

In these timber trenches
In darkness, I dig in
God protect me in these killing fields
And save my soul, from sin

In this war I am blind
And deaf from friendly fire
Protect my heart with Your shield
Be my Jehovah Jireh

These trenches are my prison
The enemy marches near
God, my rock of ages past
Break me out of here

I wave my flag of dirty white
At Your feet, I fall
To my Jesus and my Friend
I surrender all

Read Full Post »